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I Dream Africa

Swakopmund Jetty

   

Swakopmund Jetty

Swakopmund’s famous landmark, the jetty, was officially reopened on Friday, 30 July 2010. The Swakopmund Municipality closed the jetty already back in 1998 on safety grounds, as it was no longer deemed safe for people to walk on.

Work on the Jetty, which was originally planned to be 640 m long, started in 1911, but when World War I broke out only 262 m had been completed. After the war, the South Africans decided to use Walvis Bay as a port and abandoned the jetty which was later turned into a promenade.

The jetty was declared unsafe in the mid-1980s and 17 pillars of the first section was encased in concrete. It was reopened in December 1986, but was again closed to the public in 1998 because of safety concerns.

The first section was rehabilited and re-opened in 2008, but due to a lack of funds the second section was closed to the public and left to disintegrate. This was when Swakopmund businessman Quiton Liebenberg came up with a plan to restore the second half of the jetty and to build a restaurant at the very end. Swakopmund’s famous landmark, the jetty, was officially reopened on Friday, 30 July 2010.

The "new" jetty has some new additions, such as the southern side for walking and the northern side for fishing, a second deck offering uninterrupted views over the Atlantic Ocean, and an up market seafood restaurant and oyster bar at the end of the 300-metre pier. The jetty has toilet facilities and no waste is deposited into the sea. Entrance is free. The Lighthouse Group, which developed the "new" jetty and will maintain and manage it, promised the public to provide 24-hour security.

   
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