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I Dream Africa provides a comprehensive directory of activities, hot spots, top locations etc. in Namibia. Combined with the directory, I Dream Africa also provides tour packages allowing clients to experience Namibia at its best.
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Bats

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Microchiroptera (small bats or microbats)

ALOE SEROTINE BAT

Introduction: The Aloe serotine bat (Neoromicia zuluensis) is the smallest of Namibia's 3 species of serotine bats, similar in size to the Cape serotine bat. It is known to live in woodland savannahs and hunts in areas of permanent water. The name Aloe refers to the ornithologist Austin Roberts collecting the species from the leaves of aloes. They roost in other retreats as well though, such as the roofs of buildings.

Distribution: Erongo Mountains in Damaraland. Baynes, Omavandaberge and Otjihipa Mountains, and the Black Hills, all in Kaokoland.

Diet: Small soft-bodied insects.
Coloring: Yellowish-brown hair with white under parts. The wings are blackish-brown.

Breeding: Females normally give birth to twins around late November and early December.

Size: Males 80mm, females 90mm. Weight: Males 5.9g, females 7.3g.

ANGOLA FREE-TAILED BAT

Introduction: The Aloe serotine bat (Neoromicia zuluensis) is the smallest of Namibia's 3 species of serotine bats, similar in size to the Cape serotine bat. It is known to live in woodland savannahs and hunts in areas of permanent water. The name Aloe refers to the ornithologist Austin Roberts collecting the species from the leaves of aloes. They roost in other retreats as well though, such as the roofs of buildings.

Distribution: Erongo Mountains in Damaraland. Baynes, Omavandaberge and Otjihipa Mountains, and the Black Hills, all in Kaokoland.

Diet: Small soft-bodied insects.

Coloring: Yellowish-brown hair with white under parts. The wings are blackish-brown.

Breeding: Females normally give birth to twins around late November and early December.

Size: Males 80mm, females 90mm. Weight: Males 5.9g, females 7.3g.

ANGOLA WINGED BAT

Introduction: The Angola free-tailed bat (Mops condylura) roost in crevices, caves, attics and expansion joints in bridges. They are common in their distribution range, occurring in colonies ranging from a few individuals to several hundred, often in co-existence with the little free-tailed bat. At bridges, the Angola free-tailed bat uses it's wings as air brakes prior to landing.

Distribution: The forest areas of the Caprivi Strip

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: A rich dark brown fur with lighter under parts, a tawny throat colour with a grey-brown chest and a whitish belly. The wings are brown.

Size: Average body length 100mm. Weight: 15g.

BANANA BAT

Introduction: This species is so called due to its habit of small colonies (of less than 10 bats) roosting by day in the rolled-up leaves of the banana plant. Small groups can also roost in the nooks and crannies in buildings and in the leaves of palms, due to its sucker pads on the thumb and soles of the rear feet.

Distribution: The banana bat favors plantations near permanent sources of water which also provide appropriate roosting places.

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: Various shades of brown fur on the back with lighter under parts. The wing membranes are brown.

Size: Average body length 77mm.

Weight: 4g

BUTTERFLY BAT

Introduction: Butterfly bats are associated with open plant vegetation, semi-arid regions and riverine forests. They prefer thatched roofs, a feature of accommodation and lodges in northern Namibia and are known to huddle in small groups of 10 in nearby thick vegetation.

Distribution: Northern Namibian areas such as Etosha National Park, Caprivi Strip and further west along the Kavango River regions reaching as far as Epupa Falls on the Kunene River.

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: A dark, reticulated pattern (similar to that of a giraffe) opposite to its light yellow base wing colour.

Size: Average body length 110mm. Weight: 12-14g

CAPE SEROTINE BAT

Introduction: The Cape serotine bat is one of the most widespread of the African species of bat. Variations in size and appearance are considerable within serotine bats, but for the Chiropterologists, the Cape serotine bat is characterized by its 32 chromosomes. A feature of the serotine is its distinctive 'helmet' on the skull. It can be found in a wide range of habitats, including deserts, as long as sufficient water, food and shelter exist. Small colonies of around 6 roost under thick concentrations of leaves and in sheltered nooks of houses and barns.

Distribution: Throughout Namibia less for the Namib Desert.

Diet: Insects over or on water or under the canopies of tall trees.

Coloring: Black-based fur, with yellowish-brown white tips. The wings are blackish-brown.

Breeding: The female usually gives birth to twin pups during late November and early December. Newly born off-spring cling on to the mother's fur and nipples on hunting expeditions.

Size: Females 90mm. Males 80mm.

Weight: Females 7.3g. Males 5.9g.

COMMERSON’S LEAF-NOSED BAT

Introduction: Commerson's leaf-nosed bat is the largest insectivorous bat in southern Africa. It has long hind legs and sharp, prominent dark claws. Its well-developed canines are capable of inflicting a nasty bite. These features have lent some experts to believe that this bat may be carnivorous, although only preying on insects disproves this theory.
Colonies ranging from a few to several hundred roost in caves or in the hollows of trees. They are lone foragers at night and travel considerable distances to rest, groom and listen for prey.

Distribution: Widespread from Windhoek, north to the Angolan border, including Etosha National Park and as far east as the Caprivi Strip and Victoria Falls.

Diet: Small to large insects (termites to beetles) with hard skeletons.

Coloring: Short, thick fawn fur, lighter on the head and back and light tawny undersides.

Size: Average body length 150mm.

Weight: Up to 130g. Wingspan: 600mm.

DAMARA WOOLLY BAT

Introduction: The Damara woolly bat is recognized by it's soft, woolly fur that grows away from the body as the paler tips curl up and give it a 'grizzly appearance'. A braincase that rises to a high dome over the long rostrum and a fringe of hair along the edge of the interfemoral membrane are other significant characteristics of this species. It is larger than other woolly bat species.

Distribution: Damaraland and the far north of Namibia.

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: Silvery-topped, reddish-brown fur on the upperparts and grayish-brown under parts and brown wings.

Size: Average body length of 95mm.

Weight: 6-9g.

DARLING’S HORSESHOE BAT

Introduction: Darling's horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus darlingi) like others of the species, are competent and active hunters mainly due to their broader wings and superior echolocation abilities. Colonies normally number a few dozen. The species was named after a mining engineer J. Darling who collected his initial specimens from Mazoe in Zimbabwe.

Distribution: The rockier terrain of the far-eastern Caprivi Strip.

Diet: Terrestrial insects.

Coloring: Drab grey fur with a lighter shade of grey on the undersides. The wings are light grey-brown with light brown pointed ears.

Breeding: Female Darling's horseshoe bats give birth to a single offspring, normally during the warmer, wetter early summer months.

Size: Total length of 85mm.

Weight: 9g.

DENT’S HORSESHOE BAT

Introduction: Dent's horseshoe bat is one of the smallest bats in southern Africa. As it occurs in hot, dry regions they are dependant on deep caves that offer, cool, humid but stable interior living conditions. Colonies vary from a few to several hundred. They roost on cave ceilings and cling to the walls of caves or from stalactites.

Along with Schreibers's long-fingered bat and the Egyptian slit-faced bat, Dent's horseshoe bat can also be found in Arnhem Cave and Rest camp.

Distribution: Throughout Namibia less for the Namib Desert.

Diet: Small soft-bodied insects.

Coloring: Pale grey to pale brown to pale cream soft and long hair.

Size: Average body length of 70mm.

Weight: 6g.

EGYPTIAN FREE-TAILED BAT

Introduction: The Egyptian slit-faced bat is one of the most common bats in southern Africa and the most widely found of the slit-faced bats. They can occur from a few individuals up to colonies of some 600 and are one of the 6 species that can be found in Arnhem Cave Rest camp. As with Schreibers's long-fingered bat they inhabit deep, dark caves and hollow trees as a daytime destination. They are known to use regular night roosts for grooming and resting between feeding forays. After dark they hunt and feed 'on the wing'.
Distribution: All over Namibia but seldom found in forested areas. It is usually found in open woodland savannah and in the Kalahari and Namib Deserts.

Diet: The Egyptian slit-faced bat hunts favourite insects and spiders, swooping from their perches once their flight path has been cleared by air-traffic control.

Coloring: Buffy-brown silky fur with slate-grey bases and buffy or off-white under parts.

Size: Average body length 100mm.

Weight 10-11g.

EGYPTIAN SLIT-FACED BAT

Introduction: The Egyptian slit-faced bat is one of the most common bats in southern Africa and the most widely found of the slit-faced bats. They can occur from a few individuals up to colonies of some 600 and are one of the 6 species that can be found in Arnhem Cave Rest camp. As with Schreibers's long-fingered bat they inhabit deep, dark caves and hollow trees as a daytime destination. They are known to use regular night roosts for grooming and resting between feeding forays. After dark they hunt and feed 'on the wing'.

Distribution: All over Namibia but seldom found in forested areas. It is usually found in open woodland savannah and in the Kalahari and Namib Deserts.

Diet: The Egyptian slit-faced bat hunts favourite insects and spiders, swooping from their perches once their flight path has been cleared by air-traffic control.
Coloring: Buffy-brown silky fur with slate-grey bases and buffy or off-white under parts.

Size: Average body length 100mm.

Weight 10-11g.

FLAT-HEADED FREE-TAILED BAT

Introduction: The flat-headed free-tailed bat is a free-tailed bat, differing to others of the species by an extraordinary flattened skull. This is not apparent when the bat is alive. Studies have discovered it has the ability to roost in the narrowest of rock crevices, impossible roosting destinations for other bats. Another distinguishing feature is the lack of a sheathed tail membrane. They also have wrinkled upper lips and 'complex ears'. Their narrow, elongated wings enable them to fly fast and straight.

Distribution: The flat-headed free-tailed bat head for open seasonal waters in the rainy season, specifically in the Namib Desert and at Rosh Pinah in southern Namibia.

Diet: They catch large insects found in open air spaces over water.

Coloring: Fur coloration varies from region to region and within a colony. In Namibia they are tawny-olive to brownish-grey to dark seal-brown with lighter under parts in shades of grayish to white.

Size: Average body length 110mm.

Weight: 13-15g

GEOFFROY’S HORSESHOE BAT

Introduction: Geoffroy's horseshoe bats are highly gregarious creatures that occur in colonies of several thousand if suitable roosting sites exist. One such site is at Arnhem Cave and Rest camp. As with other rhinolophids they have the ability to hibernate in temperate regions and roost from ceiling sanctuaries. This allows them to tolerate colder conditions, especially with an associated lack of resident insect prey.
During the summer months, Geoffroy's horseshoe bat accumulates body fat, providing fuel to survive the colder winter months. They can then reduce body functions and lower heartbeat levels as low as 2 pulses per minute.

Distribution: Namib Desert and southern and central Namibia.

Diet: Moths and small beetles and any ground insect can be caught due to their wing design. Their flying ability permits them to land on the ground.

Coloring: Brown-tipped grey fur.

Size: Slightly smaller than Rüppells horseshoe bat.

HAIRY SLIT-FACED BAT

Introduction: The hairy slit-faced bat (Nycteris hispida) is a fragile creature and is characterized by 3-lobed upper incisors. Skin folds on the snout form a deep slit between the nostrils reaching up to the forehead. The importance of this feature is that sensitive organs connected to echolocation are safeguarded within this slit.

Individuals or small colonies of up to 20 roost in dense bushes, houses and buildings, caves and ant bear burrows on a permanent basis.

Distribution: Tropical forests of the far-eastern Caprivi Strip, specifically Zambezi River valley areas.

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: Sepia brown fur, lighter on the undersides and dark blackish-brown ears and wings.

Size: Total length of 90mm. Wingspan: 280mm.

LESSER WOOLLY BAT

Introduction: As its name implies, the lesser woolly bat (Kerivoula lanosa) is a smaller version of the Damara woolly bat. It is an extremely rare species. Their broad ears, with inner and outer edges curling inwards, give it a funnel-shaped appearance. They are associated with forests and riverine vegetation. The lesser woolly bat roost in weavers' nests.

Distribution: Mahango National Park & Panhandle of the Okavango Delta in Botswana

Diet: Hunts for insects within 2m of the ground.

Coloring: Dark fur changing to dull buffy colour.

Size: Total body length 80mm. Weight: 6-8g.

LESSER YELLOW HOUSE BAT

Introduction: The lesser yellow house bat (Scotophilus borbonicus) is more common than the yellow house bat, but has a smaller distribution range. As its name suggests, it is the smallest version of yellow house bats. They are found in areas of tall mopane woodland, seeking refuge in the cracks and hollows of dead tree trunks, resting and roosting individually or in small groups.

Distribution: North-eastern Namibia.

Diet: Medium to large flying insects, preferably beetles.

Coloring: Light to dark yellowish-brown smooth, short, silky fur with white or grayish-white under parts.

Breeding: Females give birth to twins in late November/early December.

Size: Total body length about 120mm. Weight: 16g.

LITTLE FREE-TAILED BAT

Introduction: The little free-tailed bat (Tadarida pumila) is the smallest of Namibia's free-tailed bats. They roost in roof structures of buildings, taking as much as 80% of the roof space to hide from predators. They are noisy tenants, present throughout the year and the smell of their body odor combined with guano makes them a most unpleasant visitor.

Distribution: Woodland savannah areas of north-eastern Namibia.

Diet: Little free-tailed bats consume an enormous amount of insects. They hunt flying insects above vegetation at speed in open air space.

Coloring: Brown or deep blackish-brown fur with light brown under parts with a characteristic variable median broad white band of fur from the chest to the anus.

Breeding: Female little free-tailed bats can have 3 pregnancies in one summer, giving birth to one pup per pregnancy.

Size: Total head and body length 90mm. Weight: 11.5g.

LONG-TAILED SEROTINE BAT

Introduction: This is the largest member of its genus in the southern region. Only up to 6 long-tailed serotine bats are found at a time, roosting in places of refuge such as rock crevices, caves, mines and sheltered areas in buildings.

Distribution: From the Orange River in the south of Namibia through the central highlands as far north as Omaruru.

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: Fawn upper parts in desert regions. A darker brown or blackish in areas of higher rainfall. The under parts are lighter but greyer and the ears and wings are dark brown.

Size: Average body length 115mm.

Weight: 16.6g

MAURITIAN TOMB BAT

Introduction: The common name of the Mauritian tomb bat (Taphozous mauritianus) was derived when the original specimen was collected from 'under the eaves of a tomb in Mauritius'. The Afrikaans name is witlyfvlermuis, referring to the pure white belly. They are migrants and will move away in the colder, winter months, returning to the same roosting places when they return in summer.

Mauritian tomb bats can be identified by their elongated face with a pointed muzzle and short, broad ears. Another prominent feature is their eyes, larger than other species of the same size. It is believed that they communicate by smell, as the glandular sac on the throat of the male excretes an aromatic substance.

Mauritian tomb bats occur in small harem groups of up to 12, consisting of a mature male with mature females and their young. They roost by day in large trees. Their grey fur blends in with the background of the bark making them hard to see. They also rest under thatched eaves of cottages, with individuals remaining on sentry duty throughout the day.

Distribution: Caprivi Strip.

Diet: Insects taken on the wing in flight.

Coloring: Grey grizzled with white fur on the back with a pure white belly.

Breeding: Females give birth to a single young.

Size: Total length 110mm. Weight: 36g.

MIDAS FREE-TAILED BAT

Introduction: Midas free-tailed bats (Mops midas) are a gregarious species, occurring in colonies ranging from a few dozen to several hundred. They roost in variety of locations, ranging from hollows in dead trees, buildings and expansion joints in bridges, occupying these locations throughout the year.

Distribution: The woodland savannahs of the Caprivi Strip

Diet: Larger insects are caught on the wing in fast flying manoeuvres.

Coloring: Short dark brown fur, 'sparsely flecked' with white hair with paler under parts. Wings are dark brown with a narrow band of white, silky hair at the base.

Size: Average body length 140mm. Weight: 48.5g. The males are larger and heavier than the females.

NAMIB LONG-EARED BAT

Introduction: Information on this species is very scarce indeed. It is believed that it forages along river beds were greater concentrations of insect can be found. Loose bark of the Acacia trees, common along the Kuiseb River are a favored roosting places for the Namib long-eared bat.

Distribution: Water holes in the Kuiseb River bed at the Namib Desert Research Station.

Diet: Insects

Coloring: Light fur consistent with desert animals. Light fluffy-brown fur with olive-brown wing membranes.

Size: Average body length 105mm.

PALE FREE-TAILED BAT

Introduction: The pale free-tailed bat (Chaerephon chapini) like all other free-tailed bats, has wrinkled upper lips and a complex ear structure and long, narrow wings. A distinguishing feature of the pale free-tailed bat is the pale coloration of the fur, (hence the name). It also owns an unusually long tuft of reddish and white erectile hair against the neck, where a fold of skin behind, joins the ears on the top of the head.

Distribution: Dry woodland areas of northern Namibia, living in small colonies not far from Ruacana Falls and Mahango National Park.

Diet: Insects.

Coloring: The fur on the back is a pale cinnamon-brown with off-white individual hairs at the base. The under parts of the body are grayish-brown with a whitish brown from the throat to the sternum. The wings are mainly white.

Size: Average body length of 150mm

RENDALL’S SEROTINE BAT

Introduction: Serotine bats roost in small groups in any nook or cranny of buildings, rocks and trees. They have been described as 'small, drab and unobtrusive creatures' that frequent woodland savannah areas with permanent water.

Distribution: Caprivi Strip especially Bwabwata National Park, Chobe and Zambezi River areas.

Diet: Rendall's serotine bats hunt for insects hovering around trees and shrubs, 2m above the ground.

Coloring: It's most distinguishing feature from other serotine bats is a white, translucent wing membrane. Fur is dark, chocolate brown at the base, changing to reddish-brown tips. The under parts are grayish-white, with pure white anal fur.

Size: No more than 90mm in length. Weight: Adults weigh around 6-7.5g

RUPPELLS BAT

Introduction: As populations of Rüppells bat (Pipistrellus rueppellii) are small in southern Africa, they are not often seen and considered rare. Subsequently information is low. What is known is their dental features, the shape of the tragi and their size. They roost in small groups in holes and crevices of trees in the day.

Distribution: Caprivi Strip.

Diet: Rüppells bat hunts insects in riverine forests.

Coloring: The fur on the sides and back are grey. The pure white fur on the under parts makes it easily identifiable from other Pipistrelles.

Size: Average length 100mm. Weight: 7g.

RUPPELLS HORSESHOE BAT

Introduction: Rüppells horseshoe bat occur in small colonies of about 12, mainly in open woodland savannah and depends on a selection of shelters that include caves and hollow trees, ideal roosting places that protect them from the extremes of daily weather conditions. A characteristic of the horseshoe bat is the complicated nose structure which assists their extremely sensitive echolocation abilities.

Distribution: A very wide distribution in Namibia less the Namib Desert and the extreme eastern Kalahari flanks of the central highlands.

Diet: Insects

Coloring: Grey fur on the back and undersides.

Size: Average body length of 100mm.

Weight: 14g

RUSTY BAT

Introduction: This small bat is known to emerge at dusk. Small colonies take refuge during the day under crevices and loose bark from tall trees.

Distribution: Caprivi Strip and Kavango River regions.

Diet: Small soft-bodied insects living under the canopies of tall trees.
Coloring: The rusty bat is so called due to its reddish-brown colour of the upper parts, in contrast to its light grayish-brown under parts. It has completely black wing membranes.

Breeding: The female almost without fail gives birth to twins at the end of November or early December.

Size: Average body length 70mm.

Weight: 3-4g. The females are always slightly larger than the male.

SCHLIEFFEN’S BAT

Introduction: Schlieffen's bat is one of the smallest bats in southern Africa. It is named after the collector Count Wilhelm von Schlieffen-Schlieffenburg. They roost individually or in small groups under protruding bark and crevices of holes in trees or rocks. This is one of the first bats out hunting at dusk.
It has a labored and erratic flight pattern, manoeuvring around the skies to catch as many insects as it can in one sortie, especially by flying into insect swarms at night.

Distribution: Northern Namibia from the Epupa Falls region, Etosha National Park, Caprivi Strip to Victoria Falls.

Diet: Small soft-bodied insects at or near permanent sources of water.

Coloring: Short light fawn fur on the back with a paler fur on the abdomen. The wings are dark brown.

Breeding: Schlieffen's bat mate in April/May and females store sperm until August when she gives birth to twin pups, who can fly and fend for themselves within a month.

Size: Average body length of 75mm.

Weight: 4.6g.

SCHREIBER’S LONG-FINGERED BAT

Introduction: The most remarkable aspect of the Schreibers's long-fingered bat is the colossal colonies that are found in deep, dark, moist caves. At times over 300,000 individuals have been recorded, a feature that can be witnessed in Namibia whilst staying at Arnhem Caves and Rest camp. The heat emitted from such numbers has been known to change the temperature of a cave. An insectivorous bat, it may live for at least 20 years.

Distribution: Widespread in Namibia from Windhoek north to the Kunene River and Caprivi Strip, less for the Skeleton Coast area.

Diet: Small, soft bodied insects, especially over concentrations of water at night.

Coloring: Dark brown or charcoal coloured fur.

Size: Average body length 110mm. Weight: 10g

SUNDEVALL’S LEAF-NOSED BAT

Introduction: The Sundevall's leaf-nosed bat has best been described as small and fragile. It occurs widely in wooded savannahs. Colonies are restricted to from just a few to several hundred and are one of the 6 species that can be found in Arnhem Cave and Rest camp.

Like many other species of leaf-nosed bat, they are cave dwellers. They also inhabit in the sanctuary of rock fissures, culverts, the dark interiors of deserted buildings, disused mine adits and hollow trees.

Distribution: From central Namibia north to the Angolan border including Etosha Park, the Kavango region, Kalahari Desert and in isolated regions at the mouth of the Orange River.

Diet: Individuals emerge at dusk to hunt. They have a keen sense of echolocation and catch small insects in their wings in flight.

Coloring: Off-white to predominately dark grayish-brown long, woolly fur with a lighter shade on the abdomen to that of the back.

Size: Average body length 80mm.

Weight 7-8g.

YELLOW HOUSE BAT

Introduction: Yellow house bats have bulldog type facial features and are slightly larger than the lesser yellow house bat. It is associated with habitats such as woodland savannah. By day they roost in hollows and cracks in large trees and by night in isolated sections of roofing and cracks in walls. Colonies of roosting yellow house bat are so quiet, occupants inside are usually not aware of their presence.

Distribution: Northern Namibia from Etosha National Park stretching to Epupa Falls and the Kunene River, along the Kavango River, Caprivi Strip to Victoria Falls.

Diet: Individuals normally take 2hr night-time feeding sessions, catching insects in their wings.

Coloring: Adults have a bright yellow belly with short brown fur tinged with olive, red or grey. The wings are translucent and brown.

Size: Average body length 130mm. Weight: 27g.

Megachiroptera (large bats or megabats) found in Namibia:

ANGOLAN EQAULETTED FRUIT BAT

Introduction: The Angolan epauletted fruit bat is slightly larger in size to Peters's epauletted fruit bat. Many of their species have 'prominent transverse ridges in the soft palate' to compress fruit pulp against the tongue. This enables them to withdraw juices and then throw away the pulp.

Distribution: In the far north of Namibia, specifically from Epupa Falls to Oshakati regions to the Angolan border.

Diet: Mainly larger fruits such as papayas, flowers, buds and nectar.

Coloring: Buffy-brown above, paler below.

Size: Average body length of 140mm

PETER’S EQAULETTED FRUIT BAT

Introduction: Peter's epauletted bat is mostly found where indigenous fruit-bearing trees grow in particular fig-trees. The dense riverine forests that are found along the Okavango and Chobe Rivers, as well as the Kwando River are such areas.

This particular species often congregate in large colonies, numbering hundreds. A feature is the interaction between neighboring bat colonies, resulting in a fair amount of noise, centering around roosting space.

Distribution: Caprivi Strip.

Diet: Fruit from orchards, especially papaya and fig-trees.

Coloring: Externally they are similar in size and appearance to the Angolan epauletted fruit bat.

Size: Average body length: Male 150mm, Female 120mm.

Weight: Males 140g, Female 90g.

STRAW-COLOURED FRUIT BAT

Introduction: The common name of the straw-coloured fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) refers to the fur colour on the shoulders and back. It is the largest bat in the southern sub region. It is common throughout the equatorial forests of Africa and because of it's size, individuals have a migratory range that covers all of southern Africa, including Namibia. This is accounted for by their 'highly developed nomadic urge'.

Distribution: Individually throughout Namibia. Migratory.

Diet: Mangoes, paw-paws, avocados, figs, bananas and passion fruit and other soft, pulpy fruits.

Coloring: Straw-coloured fur on the shoulders and back with darker brown hair on the rump and lighter under parts.

Breeding: A single young is born in November and carried by the mother until it can fend for itself. (But only in the tropical forest region of their range).

Size: Total body length 190mm. Weight: 240-280g. Wingspan: 750mm.

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