SpacerSpacerSpacer
Shadow
my I Dream Africa
  Register
     Why Register? Forgot my password
I Dream Africa provides a comprehensive directory of activities, hot spots, top locations etc. in Namibia. Combined with the directory, I Dream Africa also provides tour packages allowing clients to experience Namibia at its best.
Lake Otjikoto
Sig shot
4x4 Guided Self Drive
Namibia is a perfect starting po...
4x4 Guided Self Drive
4x4 Self Drive
Namibia is a perfect starting po...
4x4 Self Drive
4x4 Self Drive - Namibian Deserts
Namibia's deserts offer the ...
4x4 Self Drive - Namibian Deserts
Namibia Wild Fishing Challenge
One on one in an epic battle bet...
Namibia Wild Fishing Challenge

Shadow
Shadow
Shadow
Spacer Spacer
Spacer Spacer

Lake Otjikoto

Font Size Increase Font Size Decrease Print Page Send to Friend Add to Favorites

Lake Otjikoto

Otjikoto is situated close to the mining town of Tsumeb. Part of an underground river system, the lake was exposed when the roof of what was a large dolomite cave fell in. The lake is small with a diameter of about 102m, but very deep, with a depth estimated to be in excess of 142m in places. The lake is situated near the town of Tsumeb and is en-route from there to the Namutoni entrance to the Etosha National Park.

During the First World War the Union of South Africa, still part of the British Empire, was ordered to invade German South West Africa. The German troops were heavily out-numbered by the Union forces, but managed to hold out for nearly a year before finally being forced to surrender. The final hostilities took place in the vicinity of Otjikoto and, rather than surrender their weapons and artillery to the enemy everything, including the heavy guns and ammunition wagons, was dumped into the lake. Many of these relics have since been recovered, but not all. The lake still contains various pieces of artillery and there are rumours that the German troops also disposed of their war chest in the same manner. Stories are told of a large safe, the edges and keyhole sealed with molten lead and containing 6 million gold marks, being lowered into Lake Otjikoto. The safe has never been seen again.

The first Europeans to see Otjikoto were the Englishman Sir Francis Galton and the Swede Charles Anderson who discovered the lake by accident in 1850.

The name is derived from the Otjiherero language and means deep hole. The San called it "Gaisis" which means very ugly because they were afraid of the deep water. When Galton and Anderson first stumbled on Otjikoto they went for a swim. The local Herero and Owambo people were surprised because local belief was that nobody could survive the mysterious waters.

The rare and endangered species, Otjikoto Tilapia, is found in the lake.

Lake Guinas is situated southwest of Otjikoto, a 50km (31miles) round trip from the main road, but it is usually bypassed in favour of Otjikoto. The detour is well worth the effort, as Guinas is not only deeper, but more scenic than its more famous counterpart.

Spacer
Add to Wish List
Add to Wish List
Spacer
Send Enquiry
Contact Us
Spacer
Send Enquiry
Share this page
Spacer  
   
Spacer  
Spacer Spacer Spacer Spacer Spacer

Random Lake Otjikoto Images

Spacer
Scenery Lake Otjikoto Otjikoto Lake Bottom Scenery Landscape
Spacer
View images in Lake Otjikoto Gallery
 
Spacer  
Spacer Spacer Spacer
People Who Looked at

People who looked at "Lake Otjikoto" also looked at...

Expand People who looked at
 
Spacer  
Spacer Spacer Spacer
Where to Go

Where to Go in and around Tsumeb

Expand Where to Go
 
Spacer  
Spacer Spacer Spacer
Where to Go

Where to Stay in and around Tsumeb

Expand
 
Spacer  
You have 0 items in your wishlist. View all items in your wishlist
Enquire Now
News and Updates
In the Media
Newsletter
Recently Viewed
Top 10
Namibian Hightlights
Preparing for Namibia
Namibian Facts

Shadow
Shadow
Shadow
Spacer Spacer Spacer
   Designed and Developed by ProDG, maintained by iWits Web Development   Terms & Conditions | Disclaimer | Site Map   
Shadow